Posts by Nick Batzig

 

A number of years ago, I concluded that it is officially an American tradition to have stressful interactions with parents, in-laws, grandparents, siblings, uncles, aunts and cousins on Thanksgiving Day. I have experienced some extremely relationally tense times with family members on Thanksgiving Day. I have a suspicion that I am not alone. Recently, a member of our congregation was telling me how thankful they were that a particular family member would not be with their extended family over Thanksgiving. This sentiment is not foreign to many in our church fellowships--though it is one for which our hearts should grieve. 

 

In the death of Jesus, the evil one has been bound and conquered. Our Savior has taken possession of his eternal inheritance by overcoming the evil one. We are now called to "go into all the world and make disciples..." (Matt: 28:18-20). We are to gather the spoils of the One who destroyed the works of the devil by his death on the cross. While we await the full manifestation of this victory (Matt. 25:41; Rom. 16:20 and Rev. 20:10) we are to be confident in the Satan-binding nature of the death of our Savior. We live in light of the freedom we have from his condemning accusations and the fear of death that, for far too long, held all of us in bondage.

 

In doctrinally serious churches, welcoming the children of believers to the Lord's Supper is one of the most important elements of the life of the church; it is also one of the most difficult and widely debated matters. 

 

As we consider our own lives and actions--in light of this world and the current cultural climate in which we live--we must constantly ask ourselves the question, "Where am I placing my hope?" I am certain that if we answer this question honestly, we will uncover something of a recurrent deficiency in our souls. We must then turn back to Scripture in order to again discover the promise of the coming of Christ. As we do so, we will undergo the spiritual realignment that we so desperately need in order to again live in light of that hope.

 

We live in what has to be the most frenetic society in all of human history. It seems as though things are just getting faster and faster, and the pressure to fill our schedules with non-essential activities is becoming more and more demanding. The impact of such a dynamic is not easy to measure; but, one of the things that I have noticed in my own life is that it is easy for our devotional life and family worship to fall by the wayside if we are not guarded and purposeful about it. There are quite a number of practical steps that we can take in order to carry out the pursuit of feeding our own souls and bringing our shepherding our childred, even in the midst of such a frenetic society.